Network Seminar - July 14, 2011

Adriana Castelli is a Research Fellow in the Health Policy Team at CHE, which she joined in 2004. She has an MSc and PhD in Economics both awarded by the University of York. Before joining the Health Policy team, Adriana was a Research Fellow (2002) at the Department of Economics, University of York, for the EU project 'Rationing of Medical Services: An Empirical Study'. 

Her research interests include health policy reforms, performance measurement with a particular focus on the development of productivity measures of healthcare goods and services, analysis of geographical/spatial variation in quality of life indicators (not only health related) and health and social care. 

Adriana has published in Health Economics, Health Economics Policy and Law, National Institute Economic Review and Social Policy Review.


Network Seminar - July 14, 2011


Webcast: http://mediacast.ic.utoronto.ca/20110714-HSPRN/index.htm

The English NHS has received significant increases in funding over the last few years. For public accountability it is crucial to assess whether the increased public spending in the NHS or by its various organisations has achieved 'value for money' (Atkinson, 2006). To this end, we construct measures of NHS output, input and productivity. 

Output comprises of all care provided to NHS patients in either the acute or community setting. We adjust output for changes in quality, captured in terms of survival rates, waiting times and disease management. We measure growth in labour, intermediate and capital inputs. Productivity is assessed by comparing output growth with growth in inputs. We analyse data from sources including the Hospital Episode Statistics, Reference Cost returns, Workforce Census, Financial Returns and Prescription Pricing Authority. 

We calculate sub-national (Strategic Health Authorities) estimates of input, output and productivity growth in an attempt to determine which parts of the country secure best value for money in the NHS.

Please click here to view the NHS Seminar PowerPoint